Are You Normal?

Ask your question today!

How do you judge a persons value?
Favorited (undo) 41 Comments

8
125
9
45
14
12
110
Skip & see results
Next >>
Help us keep this site organized and clean. Thanks! [Report] [Best Of] [Vulgar] [Funny] [Fake] [Weird] [Interesting]
Comments (41)
You don't. We are all of equal value, no matter what we do or say, or what we look like. No matter what terrible things a person might have done, their value as a human being does not change.
Comment Hidden (show)
-
@: dom180
Right, so the value of a person like Hitler to the value of a person like, let's say a firefighter who died trying to save lives during 9/11.

Right, they have the same value....
Comment Hidden (show)
-
-
MissSorel
You missed the point. They are not comparing Hitler to 9/11, they are saying would Hitler's life, if he were still alive, have the same value as someone in the fire service/police service during the attacks on 9/11.

That's not comparing the events, that's taking a hypothetical situation of value using those two examples.
Comment Hidden (show)
-
I know what they meant. I don't believe many people truly know enough about what Hitler had done and what he had wanted to do to say he died without the value that the people dying for 9/11 did.
Comment Hidden (show)
*grandfatherly chuckle*

I remember the good old days when I was an androgenous "they" because nobody knew me here. I stumbled upon this poll again, and I just couldn't resist a little nostagic comment about the past.
Comment Hidden (show)
wigsplitz
@: dom180
That's a bunch of bullshit!
Comment Hidden (show)
-
MissSorel
Actually I agree with him. You can be appalled at someones actions but they are still technically a human being. Even if they behaved less merciful than a animal would.
Comment Hidden (show)
By their actions. That is all.
Comment Hidden (show)
First of all, a compliment to the OP. It's not often I have to think hard about a question before I answer it.

The answer I came up with is that value is contextual. It's not intrinsic. It's value "to" something or someone else. Because of this, I'm going to find myself agreeing with virtually everyone who has responded to this. As dom180 and MissSorel say, we're all born with an equal chance of being valuable. Even if we commit evil, we still have the chance to be of value and it's the same chance as anyone else. As howaminotmyself says, leaving no trace is very valuable to the world ecologically. As various others say, doing good, being kind, being entertaining, making a difference implies value. But even a model good looks are valuable in the context of them being a model.

So I guess it's not that people have an individual value. It's more a matrix of values between the person and the valuer.
Comment Hidden (show)
Actions and inner self.
Comment Hidden (show)
good luck getting honest answers here
Comment Hidden (show)
There should be an option to allow people to have more than one selection.

I would say i judge people by the inner beauty, their moral and ethic values, their level of education, and the way to treat people.
Comment Hidden (show)
I think of people, as a whole, as invaluable.
There are just too many to be beneficial anymore.
As far as individuals go, they've got to stand out with one beautiful labyrinth of a mind for me to see them as something truly valuable.
Comment Hidden (show)
Valkeer
Wealth, status, actions: all of it flows from inward characteristics.

Therefore that's what's important.
Comment Hidden (show)
-
@: Valkeer
What about people like Paris Hilton? She has both wealth and status.
Comment Hidden (show)
-
Valkeer
If she's not shrewd (inward) with her money she'll lose it.

And what status? She's known for exactly what she is: An idiot. We make fun of her on a daily basis. That's not status, is it?
Comment Hidden (show)
-
Valkeer
@: Valkeer
"Ok but still...she didn't obtain the money from inward characteristics nor her fame either"

That's true. But her parents did. It's because of them and their ability to do good business (inward) that Paris Hilton has what she does today.
Comment Hidden (show)
-
@: Valkeer
I guess you're right on that one. But think of all the families that are "old money", the ones we don't read about in the tabloids, who's kids did NOTHING to earn any of that status or wealth.
Or even pornstars, who have both and did nothing more than....well you know.
Having money or fame doesn't always mean you did something good or helpful to get it. In fact, I think the person who volunteers at the homeless or animal shelters has more value then the average celebrity who's only rich for churning out a few hit singles.
Comment Hidden (show)
By their will and strength to live and keep living.
Comment Hidden (show)
I dont.
Comment Hidden (show)
I don't really think I'd judge their value, regardless of what they do, but I appreciate people personally who try to be honest and non-judgmental.
Comment Hidden (show)
franciosdillinger
A bit of all of that i suppose.

Their actions toward me and other people
they talk about their family/significant other and get happy
care about things i care about
funny
The less they have the more value I hold for them (i'll help if possible)
Comment Hidden (show)
I judge values by intelligence, actions and political/religious beliefs.
Comment Hidden (show)
1000yrVampireKing
Moral and actions. Some people are smart but complete dicks they do not deserve any respect.
Comment Hidden (show)
1000yrVampireKing
I do not see why intelligence is the only thing to judge a person as valuable. That means if you meet a mentally retarded person you judge them as bad because they are slow. People assume that if you are smart you can not do bad and that is simply not the case.
Comment Hidden (show)
I don't judge people. They smoke? Cool. They don't smoke? Cool. Wear too much make-up? Fine then. Don't wear make-up? Perfectly fine. I get to know them. THEM. Not their appearance or intelligence
Comment Hidden (show)
Mersaphe
actions but sometimes actions are dictated by the specific circumstances of a particular situation...best would be to always put everything in context
Comment Hidden (show)
53739
Try not to judge people.
Comment Hidden (show)

Sorry, you need to be signed in to comment.

Click here to sign in or register.