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Do many other girls go without panties?
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I am 20, female. I do not wear underwear... ever except when I need to use feminine products every month.
How many others don't wear panties? Is it normal?
Is It Normal?
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Comments (10)
well i always wear underwear but i knowlots of girls who don't its normal in my opinion
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I couldn't go without, though thongs are pretty close to nothing! lol
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Hot hot hot !!
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I am a woman who only wears panties when she has to. I wear them to work and to university and that is about it.

At home? No panties

Summer? No panties

Partying? No panties
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Love your girls with or without the only think with out used panties I would have to ask that you let me put my nose in your crotch as I masturbate.
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Good for you all...it is sexy, although sexy underwear makes you girls even sexies...but if you have the ody and attetude it is a great turn-on.
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NICE !!!
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im a dude and i often go without underwear. its not a sex thing, its just, comfort
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LOOKING AT HISTORY, PANTIES WEREN'T WORN AT ALL UNTIL THE 1930'S - SEE PANTILESS IN NYC, ALSO DITCH YOUR PANTIES ...

The era spanning from the 1790s to the 1820s saw an emphasis on elegance and simplicity which was motivated by the democratic ideals of the French Republic but which looked back to classical Greece and Rome for its fashion inspiration. Waists were high, the directional emphasis was vertical, and lightweight white fabrics were at the height of fashions which were so simple that the lady of the time often wore only three garments; a chemise, a corset and a gown! This was an incredible contrast to the clothing of preceding and succeeding periods with their horizontal emphases, multiple layers and often heavy fabrics.

Chemise:
The chemise was the only ladies' undergarment used during the era. (Panties would not be developed until the 20th century and pantalets were not in vogue until Victorian times.) The chemise was simply constructed of linen or cotton. In modern terms its appearance was similar to a long blouse or short nightgown.

Corset:
In the early days of the Regency era some women wore tight but lightweight linen stays which had an effect similar to a modern push-up bra while some chose to wear no support at all. The ideal was to emulate the "classical" Greek look of ancient statuary and the older conical shaped stays of the Georgian era didn't do the trick. But soon new corset designs had caught up in "support" of the latest fashions. The corset was worn over the chemise, was typically made of linen, laced in the back, was “boned” for firmness and often had a long wooden or whalebone busk in the front to create the “lift and separate” support necessary for Regency fashions. A lady wearing a proper Regency style corset will likely carry herself with flawless posture.

Gown or Dress:
The gown was at least ankle length and had a very high “empire” waist. Some bodices scooped quite low in front and/or back while others were more moderate. Some had trains in the rear which were pinned up while dancing. The sleeves could be short or wrist length as each style was popular at different times. Even a few sleeveless gowns were seen early in the period. The fabric was usually light in color with solid white being the favorite of the era. Small patterns and vertical stripes were also used. Good fabric choices would be lightweight such as cotton batiste, lightweight cotton muslin or a silk such as charmeuse that isn’t too stiff but has a good “drape” to it. Sometimes a very light semi-transparent overdress was worn on top of the main article. White cotton voile or silk chiffon might be good fabrics for such an option. Trim could be in the form of piping, metallic braid or ribbon.
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GOOGLE "PANTILESS" "KNICKERLESS" TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE HISTORY OF PANTIES ... THERE ISN'T ANY ... WEREN'T WORN TILL VERY RECENTLY ... & FOR GOOD REASONS ... HEALTH VERSUS MOIST, WARM, DARK HAVENS FOR GERMS ETC. SUCH AS YEAST

The era spanning from the 1790s to the 1820s saw an emphasis on elegance and simplicity which was motivated by the democratic ideals of the French Republic but which looked back to classical Greece and Rome for its fashion inspiration. Waists were high, the directional emphasis was vertical, and lightweight white fabrics were at the height of fashions which were so simple that the lady of the time often wore only three garments; a chemise, a corset and a gown! This was an incredible contrast to the clothing of preceding and succeeding periods with their horizontal emphases, multiple layers and often heavy fabrics.

Chemise:
The chemise was the only ladies' undergarment used during the era. (Panties would not be developed until the 20th century and pantalets were not in vogue until Victorian times.) The chemise was simply constructed of linen or cotton. In modern terms its appearance was similar to a long blouse or short nightgown.

Corset:
In the early days of the Regency era some women wore tight but lightweight linen stays which had an effect similar to a modern push-up bra while some chose to wear no support at all. The ideal was to emulate the "classical" Greek look of ancient statuary and the older conical shaped stays of the Georgian era didn't do the trick. But soon new corset designs had caught up in "support" of the latest fashions. The corset was worn over the chemise, was typically made of linen, laced in the back, was “boned” for firmness and often had a long wooden or whalebone busk in the front to create the “lift and separate” support necessary for Regency fashions. A lady wearing a proper Regency style corset will likely carry herself with flawless posture.

Gown or Dress:
The gown was at least ankle length and had a very high “empire” waist. Some bodices scooped quite low in front and/or back while others were more moderate. Some had trains in the rear which were pinned up while dancing. The sleeves could be short or wrist length as each style was popular at different times. Even a few sleeveless gowns were seen early in the period. The fabric was usually light in color with solid white being the favorite of the era. Small patterns and vertical stripes were also used. Good fabric choices would be lightweight such as cotton batiste, lightweight cotton muslin or a silk such as charmeuse that isn’t too stiff but has a good “drape” to it. Sometimes a very light semi-transparent overdress was worn on top of the main article. White cotton voile or silk chiffon might be good fabrics for such an option. Trim could be in the form of piping, metallic braid or ribbon.
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